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Author archive for Sarah Rooker

  • Mapping Early Settlement

    By Sarah Rooker on February 21, 2018
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    The Blanchard and Langdon map, published in 1756, is one of the earliest depictions of the New Hampshire colonial towns stretching from New York to the Atlantic Ocean. The crop at the bottom of the page highlights the Connecticut River Valley. What can you say about the Native American presence by looking at this map? What parts of the region […]
  • Using Maps to Learn about Early Village Life

    By Sarah Rooker on February 21, 2018
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    What was village life like in Vermont after settlement? What did they do for food, clothing, and shelter? How and where did they travel? The James Whitelaw maps of 1796 and 1810 provide a window into that world.  These maps show the major buildings in each Vermont community. Begin by providing your students with a visual image of life at settlement. One […]
  • Links to Local Maps

    By Sarah Rooker on February 20, 2018
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    Learn North Carolina This has an essay about navigation and early European exploration as well as links to early exploration maps. Maps of the French and Indian War Blanchard and Langdon’s NH map reveals Vermont details as well. The map reveals  conflict with Native Americans as well as natural resources such as “tall white pines”. Topographical Map of the State […]
  • Teaching with Local Maps

    By Sarah Rooker on February 20, 2018
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    Have you ever tried to sketch a map of your neighborhood? If you did, what would you include? What would your students include? What do you consider the center of your neighborhood? What bounds it? David Sobel, in Mapmaking with Children: Sense of Place Education for the Elementary Years, discusses a developmental approach to children’s understandings of maps and geography. He […]
  • Blank Abenaki Map

    By Sarah Rooker on August 8, 2014
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    abenakiblank homelandmap
  • Recognizing stereotypes about Native America

    By Sarah Rooker on March 24, 2014
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    by Alan Berolzheimer This article is largely adapted from Dorothy Schlotthauer Krass, “How Do We Look? Introduction to Native Peoples and Museums,” in Native Peoples and Museums in the Connecticut River Valley: A Guide for Learning (Historic Northampton, 1992). Ideas in Krass’ essay in turn draw on “How to Tell the Difference,” by Beverly Slapin, Doris Seale, and Rosemary Gonzales, […]
  • Who First Lived in the Area We Now Call New Hampshire and Vermont?

    By Sarah Rooker on March 24, 2014
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    by Elise Guyette The area we now call New Hampshire and Vermont was originally inhabited by various groups of Abenaki people. The Alnôbak (People of the Dawn) homeland, called Wôbanakik, comprises all of both states and parts of northern Massachusetts, southern Québec, and western Maine. It has been the Abenaki homeland for at least 10,000 years, and some would say […]
  • Abenaki Culture and LT History up to European Contact (c. 1600)

    By Sarah Rooker on March 24, 2014
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    by Elise A. Guyette TIMELINE 9300 BCE 7300 BCE 1000 BCE to 1600 CE 1609 TO PRESENT Late Ice Age Archaic culture Woodland Abenaki  culture Europeans arrive/ Culture Persists Paleoindians gradually move into “Vermont.” Changing environment; migration and extinctionof large animals. Abenaki nation, culture and government develops and blooms; seasonal migrations mark the way of life. Abenaki culture survives amidst […]
  • The Rebellion in Western New Hampshire and the Proposed Union with Vermont, 1776-1784

    By Sarah Rooker on March 24, 2014
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    by Jere Daniell From New Hampshire Profile (Special Issue, 1976) In many of the colonies the general revolution against imperial domination triggered protests against state authority, protests which threatened, at times, to undermine the entire fabric of civil government. New Hampshire experienced perhaps the most serious of these revolutions within the Revolution. Soon after the signing of the Declaration of […]
  • Stories of Forced Migrations to Vermont

    By Sarah Rooker on March 14, 2014
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    by Elise A. Guyette Stories of people around the globe forced to leave their homelands are never-ending sagas of pain and loss. In American history, such stories include native peoples being forced off their lands by colonizers, Africans being kidnapped and forced into slavery, and poor whites being duped and kidnapped into indentured servitude. Their stories are interwoven. Indentured servants […]